Fish – Frozen or Fresh – the Debate Continues

Posted on Sep 20, 2017 in fish myth, health benefits

Here at Channel Fish we have many clients, consumers, and even visitors to our kitchens who ask us about the nutritional value of fish. It has been well documented for years the amazing nutritional value of all kinds of fish prepared in many different ways. One debate has raged on, however: whether fresh or frozen fish is better. Here are a few thoughts on this topic for your consideration:

Although it might seem that fresh fish would a healthier choice than frozen, the truth is that both fresh and frozen fish can be healthy choices, as long as you store and prepare them properly.

 

Fresh vs Frozen

  • Nutritional Value – In most instances, frozen fish does not change the nutritional value, especially if it is done correctly and as soon as possible. Protein, fat, and fat-soluble vitamins, such as vitamins A and D, aren’t affected by the freezing process itself. But when you thaw the fish, you can lose some of the water content. Most nutritionists believe this loss is fairly low and will not impact the overall health benefits of fish.
  • Taste – Most people do not note the difference in taste between fresh and frozen fish that has been cooked. Some types of fish can get mushy if allowed to thaw for too long, so be aware of the thawing process and the amount of time you allow for it.
  • Bacteria – Many consumers ask if bacterial growth is a factor when freezing fish. Freezing fish, in fact, halts bacterial growth that can otherwise make you sick. Eating fresh fish or keeping it in the refrigerator can also slow or even stop this bacterial growth. Proper refrigeration and freezing processes can make sure your fish remains bacteria-free.
  • Spoiling Concerns – Both fresh and frozen fish can spoil. Eating fish within a few days ensures that it doesn’t have time to spoil, so always be sure to mark the date before you put it in the refrigerator or freezer. Store fresh fish for no longer than one to two days in the refrigerator before eating. Frozen fish can spoil if it thaws during transport.

So the question is, what is most convenient for your family, freezing the fish and eating it at a later date, or eating it fresh from the market within a couple of days? It turns out that the nutritional value, taste, and appearance will remain the same in either case. Check out Channel Fish’s fresh and frozen options online.

 

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